Software made in Brazil

“Módulo Security Solutions is a Brazilian firm that has internationalized. Receiving this type of critical recognition from a major magazine in the IT segment was satisfying for us because we are doing the work right and we are showcasing Brazil among exporters of technology solutions,” recounts Sergio Thompson Flores, CEO of Módulo. With over 400 employees and its own offices in the United States, Canada, India and England, Módulo posted sales of more than R$85 million in 2013, up 20% over the previous year. “The outlook for 2014 is to continue our growth strategy by developing more solutions and functionalities in the Risk Manager software. We must continue to invest as well in stepping up our international work, primarily by setting up partnerships and winning new markets for the software,” stresses Rodrigo Palo, manager of the company based in Rio de Janeiro.

Another company from Rio is PhDsoft, which is on the verge of reentering the global market of suppliers of applications and technologies for the oil sector. The main product of the firm, founded 14 years ago by former UFRJ professor Duperron Marangon, is the C4D software, a simulation program that predicts structural failures on ships, oil platforms, bridges and other large constructions. The purpose of the technology is to prevent accidents and lower costs. C4D anticipates future conditions of critical structures. This avoids accidents and it also extends service life, resulting in significantly lower inspection and maintenance costs.

Large companies in the oil sector that operate in Brazil, such as Petrobras, Shell, Transpetro and Subsea7, are already clients of PhDsoft, which plans to open an office in Houston, Texas, by September of this year. “This will be our base for operations in the US market,” Marangon says. In addition, PhDsoft is negotiating with a government agency of the province of Nova Scotia in Canada to begin selling its products to that country. “We have always pursued the goal of internationalization. Expanding our sales outside Brazil will mean a change in the level of our business,” Marangon notes.

Read the complete report of Pesquisa Fapesp magazine here.